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Different Nigerian Delicacies You Should Try This Weekend

There are specific Nigerian delicacies you need to try this week-end if you have not already tried it. They are some of these meals.

Nigerian Delicacies You Should Really Try This Weekend

Nigeria, with her diverse ethnic groups, has several foods delicacies that even some Nigerians are yet to take to.

These ethnic groups are diversified by varying factors including culture, language, beliefs and even food choices. Even though Nigeria is diverse, food among other activities have a means of unifying the people.

Western influences have, however , transformed the Nigerian culture in lots of ways including diet plan. We have become comfortable with canned, frozen and well packaged food within supermarkets and malls.

Interestingly, we have so many foods and are creative with them, which is why we are able to adopt whatever is not ours and produce interesting stuff. We have our adopted jollof rice which doesn’t have its roots in Nigeria but most of us are not aware of.
Since we have Nigerianized it, we could afford to have social networking wars with Ghana to prove that the Nigerian jollof rice is better.

The Nigerian chapman is another thing I recently read of. Until I did, I never imagined that Nigeria had its variant of chapman. Just how many other dishes have we colonized? The list is a handful.

You will find, however , some Nigerian foods that we probably did not “colonize” because they are peculiar to certain parts of Nigeria. You may also want to decide to try them out.

There is no doubt, most of us find it too difficult preparing our local recipes. Nevertheless, these traditional recipes have wholesome value.

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You might like to try a few of these numerous recipes, below is a few Nigerian traditional recipe you should try this weekend.

Iyan (pounded yam) and ishapa

Iyan (pounded yam) and ishapa

Iyan (pounded yam) is among the Nigerian fufu recipes, created from pounding boiled yam over and over. It is common among the Ondo and Ekiti people. Ishapa is a tangy vegetable used to create egusi soup served with pounded yam. It is mostly eaten by the Ondo and Ekiti people. It comes from Zobo (roselle) a woody shrub of the hibiscus species (hibiscus sabdariffa ). The leaves are used as vegetables. Ishapa has lot of health advantages such as Lowers cholesterol, Boosting the disease fighting capability (from its high degrees of vitamin and antioxidants), Decreases inflammation of the kidneys, Decreases occurrence of urinary system infections, diuretic properties (helps with water retention) and so many more.  How to prepare.

Starch and Banga soup

Starch and Banga soup

Starch (Usi) is a favorite delicacy in the Southern part of Nigeria especially with people from Delta state. It’s the major type of “swallow” used in eating the popular Banga soup. It’s made from the normal starch found in laundry in Nigeria.  How to prepare

Abula

Abula

Abula is an excellent Yoruba soup. It is an assortment of gbegiri (bean soup) and ewedu (draw soup). Amala (yam flour) is a good brown paste made from yam or cassava flour which includes been peeled, cleaned, dried and blended into a flour and is merely delicious. You will find two types of amala which are yam flour (amala isu) and cassava flour ( amala lafun). Abula and Amala is a perfect match, you should test it out for.  How to prepare

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Masa

Masa

Masa is a northern staple similar to a pan-fried rice cake. You are able to experiment with some onion and ginger to derive that perfect taste. Traditionally, Masa is made in to oval shape.  How to prepare

Fufu and ofe owerri

Fufu and ofe owerri

This is a nutritious old-fashioned meal, loved and eaten by Owerri people. Ofe owerri is actually made with assorted fish, blended with green vegetable. Fufu is a starchy accompaniment for ofe owerri soup. It really is made with a flour produced from a cassava plant. This meal is popular for this rich taste and vitamins and minerals.  How to prepare

Eba and Edikangikong

Eba is made from cassava flour popularly known as garri. Edikangikong is another old-fashioned meal, eaten by the native of Efiks, Akwa ibom and cross river. It is prepared with an excellent quantity of pumpkin leave and waterleave. It’s nourishing atlanta divorce attorneys sense. Eba and Edikangikong is just perfect.  How to prepare

Abacha and Ugba

Abacha and Ugba

It really is popularly referred to as African Salad. It is made out of dried shredded cassava(Abacha) and fermented oil bean seeds(Ugba). Your African salad will never be complete without ugba. Just How to prepare

Tuwo masara

Tuwo masara

That is a corn flour dish popularly eaten in the Northern element of Nigeria. To get ready tuwon masara you must first let your maize dry and afterward grinded. Let your water boil and pour the grinded maize fine particles, stir and invite it to harden until it become like a firm dough. Tuwon Masara could be eaten with different kind of soups and it has nutritional values. How to prepare

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Miyan Taushe

Miyan Taushe

Miyan Taushe is a Pumpkin soup popular among the Hausas in Nigeria. It is prepared with ripe pumpkin meat and enjoyed by both young and old. You will find different species of Pumpkin, but the Gourd type is quite common in Nigeria, none the less, feel absolve to make use of any species you may get as long as it really is ripe. How exactly to prepare.

There you have the Different Nigerian Delicacies You Should Try This Weekend, Pick one 🙂

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Source :The Nation

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